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I am a mother, a new grandmother, and a teacher. But whatever happens in my life, I keep sewing. I have worked as a political communicator and now as a teacher in my formal life. I have also written extensively on sewing. I have been a frequent contributor and contributing editor of Threads magazine and I write a monthly humour/sewing column for the Australian magazine Dressmaking with Stitches. My first book Sew.. the garment-making book of knowledge will be published in May 2018 and is available for pre-order from Amazonhttps://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=barbara+emodi&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Abarbara+emodi

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Saturday, October 25, 2014

Questions for you

I have had a very quick visit to NYC, arrived yesterday and going out tomorrow early, and have lots of news to tell. That will have to wait until I am reunited with my laptop.

However as long as I have to keep it short I have two requests for any help you can give me on major life issues that are bugging me.

First does anyone know how to get stains out of a corian sink? We did our kitchen a while ago and put in a nice big deep sink that is at one with the counter top. All very nice but it is a cream colour and picks up and absorbs stains like a paper towel soaks up spilt milk. Despite all my best efforts and reading advice on the internet it looks to me like a sink in a gas station where the sign that says ladies is written in cardboard with the last two letters very small because they were running out of room. If anyone can tell me how to get this sink back to normal I would be pretty pleased. That even I am bothered tells you how bad it is.

Second does anyone have a super easy pattern for a crocheted sweater of some kind? I have been slaving away trying to teach myself how to crochet and have made so many dishcloths now in different stitches I can hardly get the drawers in my kitchen closed anymore. And after all I am a clothes maker. I would pretty much make any kind of sweater if it required the basic skills used to make 800 dishcloths.

More later, on such subjects as great surprises like meeting blog readers in the garment district and how it is possible to spend nearly half of what your plane ticket cost on tiny shirt buttons without really thinking.


22 comments:

Anonymous said...

Sink – Some suggestions:
Separately applied!

Salt and lemon – this together
Hydrogen peroxide
Oxyclean
A letter/phone call to the manufacturers of Corian

Crochet: Contact Peggy at Deconstruct, Alter and Create.
She is a very accomplished needlewoman and very stylish too. She will have some very good ideas.

Vancouver Barbara

barbara said...

good old-fashioned bleach.

Wendy said...

I'm surprised that you're having trouble with stains on your Corian. We have pure white sinks & countertops in the kitchen & bathrooms, installed in 2001, and don't have stains. The thing I love about the white Corian is that when something is on the surface, it shows, so we clean it up. But even if it stains, like grape juice or koolaid, a little rubbing with a sponge and some dish soap makes it disappear. I know you can have Corian refinished with a sander--maybe that would do it?

Bunny said...

I believe you sand the corian down. But that is just hearsay and the sales pitch I always heard.

Carol S said...

I took a quick look on Ravelry and really like this:


http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/djc-spirals

Lynn said...

I had an off-white Corian sink in my last home. I used to let the water get hot, fill the sink and pour in a cup or so of bleach and let it sit until the water cold. I would then drain and rinse. I poured coffe and red wine down the sink and this seemed to get rid of any stains. I have also found that Scrub Free with bleach really helped to get rid of stains too.

I don't know if you have tried either of these, if you have and it has not worked, I too am stymied.

Cindy said...

Bar Keeper's Friend does the job on our sink. Buy it near the Comet type cleansers in a grocery type store.

Sewalatte said...

Try biz laundry soap. It is non chlorine bleach in it. I use it for everything. Make paste, apply, let soak, rinse. Let us know what works.

Anonymous said...

I use the spray cleaner that has a bit of bleach in it. Even that little bit of bleach does the trick. I spray it down and let it sit about 10 minutes. Then I rinse. Stains all gone. If yours is too bad you can use the manufacturers instructions to "sand" with scotch brite pads. Comes in different grades. But you have to continue with decreasing fineness to make smooth and I'm not so certain I wouldn't hire a Corian installer for that.

Anonymous said...

Soft Scrub with bleach

Sheila said...

How about a cowl instead ok a sweater as quicker to make.

http://crochetincolor.blogspot.co.nz/2011/11/effortless-cowl.html

Sheila

Wendy said...

No help on the sink I'm afraid but for the crochet ideas I would happily point you in the direction of Ravelry. A rabbit hole down which I have spent too many hours, but has also helped me upgrade my knitting and crochet skills gazillion fold.

KathyS said...

I always used a little bit of water in the sink with some bleach added, let it sit for 10mins or so then rinse.

JudyM said...

If you've tried all sorts of cleaning products to no avail, the issue might be the mineral content of your water. Do you have hard water? Do you see white gunk building up along your faucets or dark stains in sink and toilet bowl? These are supposedly problems due to high minerals/hard water and not poor cleaning :-)

mrsmole said...

Lordie Girl, if you have 800 dishcloth samples maybe you should go for something like a short poncho with no armholes, just sew them all together and add a neck binding...don't we all just go overboard sometimes? Hope some of those suggestions above work for you and your sink!

Jean said...

I, too, have this problem with my cream colored Corian sink. I put a dab of gel dishwasher detergent on a dishcloth and give the entire sink a thin coating of the gel. Wait 10 minutes, then gently scrub with a scrub pad made for non-scratching (made for Teflon, etc), then rinse. I have to do this every couple of months or so....

Gorgeous Things said...

I had a white Corian sink for the last 15 years. It did collect stains, but I found that Soft Scrub with Clorox worked wonders to get them out. Liberally apply it with a sponge (and rubber gloves) and leave it for 5 minutes, then rinse. If there are any tough stains left, put more on those, and use the scrubber side of the sponge to rub it in. Leave for another couple of minutes and that should do the trick.
HTH!

Angela said...

Hi. I have a friend that I sometimes clean houses with, and I have to say that Corian is not our favorite for sinks. You can't really shine it:) However, she said that she uses Barkeepers Friend (which I use on my glass top stove, tubs, and pots and pans, so very useful), and if that doesn't do it, she uses Magic Eraser. Hope that helps!

Kay said...

I have no help for the sink, but might just have a suggestion for the crochet pattern. Have you considered a dog sweater? My son and daughter-in-law's Chihuahua is bald so I make him lots of sweaters. (OK, he's 'hairless;' all I know is that he is pink instead of white.) I have lots of patterns, both knit and crochet. One crochet pattern I like is Dapper Doggie Sweater
design by Sharon Mann. The .pdf file is at http://www.premieryarns.com/App_Themes/premieryarns.com/pdfs/P00142.pdf

Marie Donnelly said...

I have no answers to your questions. Thankfully, you have lots of possible solutions. I just wanted to tell you to have a lovely time in New York and thank you for your blog. I love it!

Anonymous said...

If it is a hard water issue, I recently discovered "Lime Away" (in the cleaning products aisle) and it is quite effective.

SimpleFibreLife said...

The only think I could recommend is a magic sponge a.k.a a microfibre sponge. But that is only if all else fails. You have to test it on an unseen area first thought. Just in case it doesn't play nicely with the surface.