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I am a mother, a new grandmother, and a teacher. But whatever happens in my life, I keep sewing. I have worked as a political communicator and now as a teacher in my formal life. I have also written extensively on sewing. I have been a frequent contributor and contributing editor of Threads magazine and the Australian magazine Dressmaking with Stitches. My first book Sew.. the garment-making book of knowledge will be published in May 2018 and is available for pre-order from Amazon

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Thursday, May 10, 2018

Basic hand sewing stitches: #3 the catch stitch

Here is one of my favourite stitches for durable, flexible hems in both wovens and knits.

I will let the video speak for itself ...



27 comments:

Lisa Laree said...

I'm loving the videos, Barbara! Thanks for doing them!

Nursebennett said...

Hi! My (well, actually your, LOL!) came yesterday and I’m frustrated because life is in my way, but hopefully this weekend I’ll have some me time. I like the videos, but thought it might be helpful to share that I read blogs from my iPad Pro via the Safari browser and the video window is small. Safari doesn’t support full screen mode. I share this because the small size combined with light fabric and thread with little contrast makes the stitches difficult for my old eyes to see. Could a close up shot be shown? Also a black, bright red, dark brown or navy thread I think might show the stitches better, but I know nothing about production. Love your blog!

Anonymous said...

Barb, your videos are great. Good verbal cues to go with the visual.

And I am so glad you wrote your book. i skimmed through it quickly when I came home from the guild meeting. It will be a great reference for someone like me who is getting back into sewing after so many years away.

Thanks
Donna

Loved your little 'Canadian eh' on page 212.

Nancy D said...

This is extremely useful! I’ve seen this stitch but this is the first time I’ve seen how it’s done, and it’s so helpful to have your explanation for why it is useful. Please keep your videos coming!

Moosiemoose said...

My mother taught me this stitch 50 years or so ago and I still use it on all my hand hemming. You can almost make it invisible on the right side. I agree, it is the best stitch for hemming. Really nice job on the videos. Jean

patsijean said...

I placed my order for your book a couple of days ago and it is already here. I love your little videos, by the way. Oh, those darn Winnipeg Jets beat our Nashville Predators tonight. The Jets advance to round three. Maybe that is a good thing as I am a nervous eater and I have not been doing my recent weight loss a favor.

wendy said...

I have your book on pre-order as it’s not yet released here in the UK and in the meantime am loving your videos! Please keep on making them.

Anne Frances said...

I am so liking these videos. So much easier if you can see rather than just having to figure it out from a written description. If I am doing a catch stitch hem I fold the hem edge back about 1/4 of an inch and work the catch stitch on the inside of the hem between the hem and the face fabric. This means you can run the toe of the iron just under the top edge of the hem and remove any possible ridge along the top of the hem. That way you really do get an invisible hem line. Doing the catch stitch over the top of the edge is very useful in some other situations, for instance catching down seam allowances in heavy cloth. Thanks again Anne

Anonymous said...

Hi Barbara,
Thank you very much for your video(s). Your demonstration is clear, informative and practical. It feels like having a personal lesson from someone who really cares to pass on her skills/experience so that it can benefit others. You certainly help me a lot with empowering advice and kind helpful education.
Thank you so much for taking the efforts to inform us with your blog (which I have been regularly reading for years), etc.
Lynda from Toronto
ps: I just sent in a book purchase request to the Toronto Public Library for your newly published book. Congratulations on your successful accomplishment getting your book written and published!

tmd said...

Love these videos. Best part of my week so far, actually. What’s I find nice about the catch stitch is that, if you’ve ironed the fold a little off or are hemming a curve, because the fabric “hangs” from the stitch, you’re less likely to get bubbles in the hem (which I invariably do if I machine-sew hems. I’m not great with a machine.) Do you ever have occasion to sew buttonholes by hand? I’ve tried to repair machine-made buttonholes where the thread wears out...the result was a hot mess.

Catherine said...

Love the video! Makes this stitch clear and easy. I finally get it! Love the wheres and whens to use it, too.

Anonymous said...

I love your blog and the videos are great - don't put yourself down. Very excited for the book! I've ordered it but have a few weeks to wait here in UK x

Barbara Carter said...

Love the videos. Love your blog. Thank you very much!!!!

Anonymous said...

A very good idea showing these stitches for those who have not learned. With Home Economic gone from our school systems long enough to have missed a generation that could be a long list. For me it brings back the days my daughter was in a Highland Dance Troupe, Forrester Dancers. In kilt construction there is about seven yards of catch stitching and that is only the beginning of hand work. Keep up the good work!!

Anonymous said...

Thank you for your videos. Thank you for your blog. Thank you for writing your book. I enjoy your stories/writing very much. I am just getting back into sewing clothes for myself after recently retiring from my work/job. I am sending you my highest compliment when I say you are a true teacher. I live in Australia and I have ordered your book on-line. I am looking forward to having it close at hand while I sew! Best wishes to you from Dianne

Doreen said...

I'm enjoying these videos (I'm in the UK where your book doesn't come out until june).
I love hand sewing but I'm left handed and I can get confused reversing some instructions is there any way please you could add a comment to help us lefthanders?

Liese Sadler said...

Good Morning from North Carolina, thank you for the vids, these last 2 have been clear. My Mum didn't teach me handsewing, so you are filling a gap for this returning sewist. But I'm sad that you seem to think that even when you're visiting your Mum or traveling that you need to find a way to keep posting ...surely we can wait a week or two? Your example about donating a book to your local library has given me the idea to do the same here in my town. All the best.

Jan said...

Just glancing up from your wonderful book to say I love the videos. As a self taught sewer I really appreciate any tips you are kind enought to share.

Anne said...

Love your videos, love your book, and more importantly love your sense of humour!

ElleC said...

Thank you for your videos, so much easier to understand watching someone doing them than reading about it (which is how I learned/taught myself). Please don't stop making them. As far as your videos being less than professional, IMHO they are perfection, everything you need to learn and nothing that you don't. As a matter of fact I feel inspired to sew after watching.

Have fun in Winnipeg and Portland. According to Amazon your book will be here Monday, I plan on waiting at the mailbox until it is delivered. Sounds reasonable, right?

lsaspacey said...

I'm another fan of handsewing hems. However, though I've been sewing over 30 years (but only sewing hems by hand for the last 10) I've mistakenly been using the catchstitch. Well, no longer! Thanks for this and you can teach an old dog new tricks. I will also request that my library purchases your book.

Esther said...

Thanks again Barbara! Love your videos and your blog! I hope to be like you when I reach your age!

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for your wonderful blog! And especially this video! I have an RTW dress that has been hanging in the closet with a partially- broken hem for months, and last night I watched your video and hemmed it up! I am excited to get your book, and since I'll be visiting Canada in July, I hope to buy it there. It will be a perfect souvenir!!

Martha said...

I love these. I sew mostly casual clothes and put in machine top-stitching for hems. But I love hand-sewing and I tend to forget this lovely stitch. Thanks so much! It's pretty enough to be on the outside. I need to just practice and engrave this in my memory.

Jill H said...

I like how relaxed the videos are. The information is professional, but the delivery is like your friend sitting across the table and chatting with you. I like how short they are, too. I skip alot of videos because I don't have the oatpatie to watch all the ipenope scenes and wait for the good stuff. I like short and to the point, like your videos are.

Jill H said...

Call and ask first. Libraries have detailed collection policies. Often, donations go right to the Friend's book sale, especially with self-published or hybrid- published books. Also, the librarians know if they had that same title for 3 years and not a single person borrowed it and other details that the public wouldn't be aware of. And please! If you don't want it on your shelf because it's old, no one else wants it either for the same reason; give it to a thrift store or recycle it. Old does not necessarily mean valuable.

Sox said...

I've seen this stitch on hems but I wasn't sure how it was done -now I do.
The video quality is fine; a real person teaching real things. What's not to like!