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I am a mother, a new grandmother, and a teacher. But whatever happens in my life, I keep sewing. I have worked as a political communicator and now as a teacher in my formal life. I have also written extensively on sewing. I have been a frequent contributor and contributing editor of Threads magazine and I write a monthly humour/sewing column for the Australian magazine Dressmaking with Stitches. My first book Sew.. the garment-making book of knowledge will be published in May 2018 and is available for pre-order from Amazonhttps://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=barbara+emodi&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Abarbara+emodi

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Sunday, March 7, 2010

Editing

I just re-read what I wrote this morning and wondered if I should take it down. That silverware story when I see it in print really embarrasses me. But maybe I should leave it as it is to remind myself what a dingbat I can be.

Who knew that when your kids grew up you had to do it too?

About time, I think, about time.

2 comments:

Erika said...

Hi Barbara,

I had to come out of lurking to respond to this. I am a mom of two young boys (who still need me to be a lap under them, yes I am appreciating it). Your story was so real and so understandable. I mean I am 20 years from it and I already understand it. And I think your sharing it restores some of the cross-generational sharing that we have lost in modern society, separated in space as many of us are from our families. Thank you for helping me think about what this could be like in the future. I love your sharing it. Bless the world of sewing blogs for creating a community where you can.

love,
Erika

Barbara said...

Erika I can't tell you how much your comment meant to me, I was really afraid that people would think I am nuts. The pressure on mothers of adult sons to be matter of fact and cool is huge, a good mother just waves and says off you go. No one quite expects you to that to a daughter, in fact being close to your daughter is a good thing. I think women have hidden a lot and you are right about cross-generational sharing, I have been thinking lately of all those women who sent sons off to war, for years and sometimes forever. What did they feel? They never said.