Saturday, September 22, 2012

Butterick 5760 and me

In my quest to develop some more TNT I made this cardigan from Butterick 5760:


It was a pretty straightforward sew with a few observations:


  • It is quite fitted. Not usual for the Big 4 but nice and sort of ready-to-wearish
  • The instructions have you interface the bands, attach them, and then do a sort of usual knit binding around the neckline.
Of course the binding is not interfaced and it goes right over the top of the band to the edge. (Are you visualizing this?) 

That means that the un-interfaced neckline can pull as a soft thing against the firmer band thing and there is a bit of a wrinkle in it.

If I make this again and I will I will apply the neckband and then sew on the extended front bands. This will deal with that problem and allow me to put a buttonhole up closer to the neck.

Here is my finished version in some rayon knit I had hanging around:

 
I had this idea that if I put on a belt it would define my waist more, but that was before I remembered I don't have a waist to define, so I actually wore this the whole day beltless.

I really am pleased with the potential of this pattern and am on a sort of a cardigan of all types roll at the moment.

On other Saturday night news around here you might be interested to know we are doing our usual expanding dinner cooking for both sides tomorrow and my husband is also making up a giant batch of his home made yoghurt.

Not to imply we are back to the land, hardly, but he loves to do odd projects.

So today after a round of golf in the rain with the dog coming along (no one else was on the course because of the rain and we know the manager - we had only to put Rascal on the leash at the 15th hole owing to the large porcupine on the green) my spouse has come home to make his yoghurt.

He puts a the whole bowl of whatever it is cooking along by keeping it the right temperature on an old pilled heating pad carefully monitored with an asphalt thermometer from work.

I couldn't make this stuff up. 

It's actually pretty good yoghurt considering the origins and I know he is precise, accurate and safe because no one has fired him from work yet and I am still alive.


The high point of my own day (no it wasn't playing 18 holes in the pouring rain) was running into Miss Scarlett and company at the supermarket.

"Nice top Babs, but what's happening to the neck?" (it had those gathered things on it).

"Let me see that, did you sew it yourself?" (I lean closer so she can turn the neckline in to see the stitching)

"Why are the sleeves a little bit short?" (I explain the usefulness of 3/4 length sleeves and she pushes hers up).

Pretty smart three year old with all the right interests.

The way I figure interest in garment sewing skips generations in my family (my grandmothers were clothes sewers, my mother and daughter think it's too fussy).

But I can tell you this one, Miss Scarlett, is one of us.

12 comments:

a little sewing said...

I love Miss Scarlet's inspection and curiosity!
And, btw, my husband makes beef jerky.

Carolyn (cmarie12) said...

This is a great cardigan and kewl for the first one. Will you make another?

I think I interfaced both bindings with a really lightweight interfacing to avoid that twisty problem. I've made this twice and have plans to make it up in another ponte knit. I had problems with the binding on my first one too and found that when I went back to the instructions I got a better finish.

Linda said...

I like this cardigan and the fabric you used to make it. Like you I think if I wear a belt I will have a defined waist also, NOT!!!

Jane M said...

Lovely new cardigan, quite chic. Your husband's cooking reminds me of a former boyriend whose mother made her yoghurt atop the refrigerator wrapped in a particular sweater. Not scientific but effective.

Shelly said...

Good to see that Miss Scarlett is one of us. No doubt you'll have her sewing in no time. BTW This is a nice fitting cardigan.

jirons42 said...

I ran into my son and his family at Costco today so I fully understand how your meeting in the store could be the highlight of your day. We are so lucky to have our grandkids living close. WOW Miss Scarlett is so perceptive for one so young!

Jodie said...

Love the cardi. I wear one all the time and must look at this pattern. I agree with Carolyn - maybe a lightweight knit interfacing on the binding...
And - I make yoghurt too. I put it in large mason jars and incubate it in the oven with just the oven light on. Works great!
And Miss Scarlett...she makes me smile and I've never met her! You'll be thinking Halloween costume there soon?
Have a great rest of your weekend,

Karin said...

This cardigan definitely seems work appropriate to me, and I bet it is comfortable!

Cleverclogs said...

Yes, it definitely jumps a generation . My grandma was a coat seamstress at one of Melbourne's premier shops in the early C20th. My mum can barely turn sheets side to middle because every time she went near the sewing machine grandma hovered, telling her what she was doing wring. I was famous in high school as the girl who sewed her finger to the seam of the first sewing project, but somehow caught the bug or gene. Now I'm trying not to inhibit my daughter with advice while occasionally coming to the rescue!

LinB said...

Hurray for Miss Scarlett! She'll be miles ahead when it comes to geometry class.

kylechristopherblog said...

Gorgeous cardigan! Great job for this one! -Chris.

velosewer said...

When the cardi works, don't bother with the belt. It does work as it is.
My money is in Miss Scarlett!